LNP cabinet sworn in

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Malcolm Turnbull’s new government is being sworn in today, but there are a couple of aspects of his new ministry that has political commentators worried. Political scientist Sarah Maddison says the increased National presence in cabinet doesn’t match up with voter’s attitudes, and the lack of female-held portfolios is disappointing, but typical of the LNP.

Election leaves Turnbull a hollow man

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Whatever the final seat count, the 2016 election hasn’t been what Malcolm Turnbull planned. At best, Turnbull will be forming a government with only a narrow majority. In a much-less-desirable outcome, he’ll be negotiating with minor parties and independents to form a minority government in a hung parliament.

Associate Professor Sarah Maddison says the future isn’t looking great for Malcolm Turnbull. Continue reading Election leaves Turnbull a hollow man

Double dissolution: what does it mean?

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It’s on… again. Malcolm Turnbull has set July 2 as a tentative date for the double dissolution, after his ABCC bill was again rejected by senate. Melbourne University’s Professor Sarah Maddison was available to talk about Labor’s gains in the polls and Turnbull’s “D-Day”.

Turnbull announces new cabinet

Prime Minister Tony Abbott listens to communications minister Malcolm Turnbull during House of Representatives question time at Parliament House Canberra, June 2, 2014. (AAP Image/Alan Porritt) NO ARCHIVING

Last Sunday, 20 September, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced his new cabinet, which saw some old faces in new roles, as well as some new faces stepping up to the front bench. I spoke to Associate Professor and Political Science academic, Sarah Maddison, about these changes and the Australian public’s perception of them.

Return of Turnbull to Liberal party power

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September 14 was a tumultuous day for Australian politics. At 4pm Malcolm Turnbull announced he was challenging Tony Abbott as leader of the Liberal Party, at 6pm Tony Abbott spoke out, at 9.15 they had a vote, and by 9.45 there was a new leader of the Liberal Party. Is this indicative of a larger trend? And what changes might Malcolm Turnbull have in store for his party and for Australia? I spoke to Melbourne University’s Associate Professor Sarah Maddison about this.